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Help the Bruised French out of the Corner!

23. May 2013, von Almut Möller, Comments (1)

There has been a lot of bad news last week: the Eurozone is further contracting, France is moving into recession and the EU has been dramatically losing support all across Europe according to figures published in a Pew poll.

Watching President Hollande’s Élysée address one year into his presidency one saw a cornered head of state fighting for his survival at home and against a growing mistrust in Europe towards the French willingness and ability to reform. Not surprisingly, President Hollande, in a desperate attempt to lift the spirits of his fellow Frenchmen, started off his speech with the French leadership in Mali. Not surprisingly, the French president then tried to gain ground vis-à-vis the dominant German neighbour by coming up with a ‘European initiative’: a real economic government, a strategy for investment, a European Energy Community and a eurozone budget. While there might be doubts about the depth and the impact of his proposals one has to acknowledge that the French president did come out of the corner.

In Berlin, however, one hears a lot of derisive commentary about France these days and there are indeed clearly different views about the future architecture of the eurozone. But I saw a man who believed in what he said, who warned that the recession caused by austerity was threatening the very identity of Europe. A President who insisted that his country had made its choice for Europe right from the start, who in the course of the crisis has been trying to “shake things up in Europe” and who is increasingly frustrated about the lack of response from Berlin. A frustration that is likely to expand also to his social democratic friends in the SPD, despite Hollande’s presence during the celebrations of the SPD’s 150th birthday this week. Hollande is watching his country being put into the camp of the ‘poor southerners’ and being publicly accused by the President of the European Commission of not understanding the opportunities of globalisation. What a humiliation for a proud nation to being graciously awarded an extra two years to cut down its deficit – in terms of communication I found this a disaster.
We have got to the point where a public blame game is going on that undermines and disempowers even the most potent leaders in Europe – how does this create the urgently needed trust among citizens that their politicians will eventually manage to find a way out of the crisis?

In all this – and it feels almost absurd living and working here – Berlin still feels like an island of peace. Recession? Didn’t the most recent numbers suggest that the German economy continued to grow, albeit mildly? And doesn’t the minor growth rate support the chancellor’s argument made continuously during the crisis that Germany cannot lift the rest of the eurozone on its own? A lack of citizens’ support? Doesn’t Germany score best in the Pew poll, with 60 per cent of Germans still in favour of the EU despite taxpayers’ money being used for the bailouts?

I wonder if Angela Merkel sometimes wakes up in the morning and asks herself whether she is Alice in Wonderland. Like Alice’s fantasy world, Merkel’s Berlin is full of absurdities these days. As the crisis is threatening to tear the union apart, Frau Merkel enjoys a never ending round dance around herself and an abundance of what I would like to call ‘conversations of comfort’. Not that it is her who actively triggers them – they just seem to happen. Just last month she conversed with the Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk in the proud representation of Deutsche Bank in Berlin. Just having published a biography on Merkel’s foreign policy Stefan Kornelius, the foreign editor of Süddeutsche Zeitung, led the conversation: no drama, no real challenge, just pleasure and comfort and agreement, and the Polish Prime Minister doing the job for Merkel by raving about pretty much anything Merkel and German. The venue was packed on this occasion and politics, business and the media gathering all seemed to be a bit in love with the lady that holds court in the most non-courting way: she just sat there and enjoyed it as seemingly everybody else. A few days later, it felt like the whole of Europe was hanging on her every word when Frau Merkel conversed with the editors of a women’s magazine in a trendy Berlin theatre, chatting about cooking and what she likes in men.

When are the media starting to do their job properly? I really hope for German and French national televisions to gang up and convince Merkel and Hollande to battle it out openly in a TV duel. One of Merkel’s ways of dealing with potentially uncomfortable adversaries is by simply ignoring them – a strategy that seems to work and make her look even stronger. With a few exceptions, she hasn’t even given her social democratic challenger Peer Steinbrück the dignity of a direct address yet. The worst thing that can happen to Hollande in his attempt to contribute to the future architecture of the eurozone now is to be ignored by the German Chancellor. Berlin should know its responsibilities.

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

On Axes and Party Politics: the End of Europe’s Predictability

30. April 2013, von Almut Möller, Comments (0)

In a commentary last year on the eve of the celebrations of the 50th anniversary of the Élysée Treaty I wondered to what extent the notion of ‘the Franco-German axis’ was still a useful framework to analyse politics in Europe. I argued that in the course of the euro crisis, economic and monetary policies in Europe have become an issue of political majorities along party families rather than of axes such as the Franco-German. Much was at stake in rescuing the euro, I argued, and political leaders travelling to European summits were forced to be increasingly responsive to their electorates—which I believed was good news for democracy. Forget about the Franco-German axis and embrace party politics as a sign of political maturity of the European Union.

I have been challenging myself on this point over the past months on various occasions and, what can I say, I am not at all convinced. As much as those small pockets of europeanised party strategists would like to see it, there is no real alignment of the European left yet, determined to jointly win back majorities to shape a ‘social Europe’ as the new eurozone is in the making. Neither is there a solid conservative bulwark led by the German chancellor to europeanise the notorious Swabian housewife. Rather, the strategies that governments embrace these days in navigating the crisis reflect a much wider repertoire. And while it seems that the old and rather predictable game of summits, axes and treaty reforms is over, the rules of the new game are yet to be written.

In the German context, Peer Steinbrück, the social democratic candidate for the 2013 general elections, is far from leading Europe’s socialists in the reconstruction of the eurozone. Indeed for tactical reasons he chose not to even try and challenge Angela Merkel in what has become her domaine réservé. Or might he be pulling the strings behind Hollande, and the French Left is doing the messy job for him now? (Trying to undermine Merkel from the outside is likely to have the opposite effect, but quite frankly I don’t believe in the existence of such witty tactics anyway). Martin Schulz, recently branded “an extension of Adenauer by social democratic means” with a whiff of respect by, of all papers, the conservative daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung is in his ambition to become the joint candidate of Europe’s social democrats for the next president of the European Commission, doing a much better job. However, Schulz has just disappointed those looking for order on the Paris angle by seconding Angela Merkel when she was personally accused by leading French socialists of dominating and ultimately destroying Europe.

I still stick to the observation that in the course of the crisis, European Union affairs have been politicised to an unprecedented degree. Party politics matter. But for those (including myself) who predicted that the rather predictable old order (‘the Franco-German axis’ ‘the net contributors versus the recipients’, ‘the Weimar Triangle’ etc.) would make way to a similarly predictable order formed along political colours and ideologies have been proven wrong.

The truth is: things have become utterly mazy and therefore rather unpredictable. Now it is for Europe’s great minds to make sense of the new rules of the European power game, of political colours and ideologies, of institutional quarrels (prominently featuring the Commission president these days), of reflexes of national pride, of the new power of domestic constraints, of old balance-of-power thinking, of the shadow of history returning, and of a longing for rationality that is expressed in Europe’s elites turning to scholarly knowledge (and, not surprisingly, failing to find answers). Welcome to the politics of unpredictability.

One thing is for sure: Those who hold the key to understanding the new game will be shaping and, ultimately, winning it.

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

Dijsselbloem or DijsselDoom – a Dutch Perspective

9. April 2013, von Adriaan Schout, Comments (0)

I already presented my reservations against the appointment of Dutch Minister of Finance, Jeroen Dijsselbloem (Labour Party) as President of the Eurogroup. The public outrage following the bankruptcy of the banking sector in Cyprus has raised new questions concerning his ‘presidency’ (for which in Dutch the more modest ‘chairmanship’ is used). My initial doubts concerned the question whether this prestigious position would be in the interest of the Netherlands – and I was bold enough to propose Olli Rehn as possible candidate for a permanent chair after his departure from the European Commission in 2014.

The Cypriot turbulence in March immediately tested Dijsselbloem’s ability as a chair. He had become minister of finance in the Netherlands only in November 2012 and his appointment was almost immediately followed by rumours about his candidacy as president of the Eurogroup. In that respect, the criticism of his lack of experience and authority during the Cyprus crisis came as no surprise. For his two rescue proposals for Cyprus the media treated him on nicknames such as “DieselBoom”, “DijsselDoom” and “EuroBaldrick” (borrowed from the series Blackadder) as well as on appeals for his resignation. The fierce debates he provoked centre on the question as to whether the deposit holders are really completely safe. ‘True’ EU believers – and bankers who long for stability – would have preferred a banking resolution including European deposit guarantees in order to prevent bank runs whereas EU sceptics wished for the dismantling of the euro. Moreover, as was to be expected, Dijsselbloem was scorned as a Dutch puppet of Germany and blamed for defending the Dutch position instead of being a neutral chair.

Yet, in view of political realities like the upcoming elections in Germany and the public reservations against saving zombie banks and eurozone countries, the decisions of the Eurogroup to dismantle the Cypriot banks and to bail in seem inevitable. Moreover, given the lack of money in any country, it is highly unlikely that former Eurogroup President Juncker would have been able to orchestrate a different outcome. Approximately € 3 trillion is needed to stabilise banks in the eurozone. It is simply impossible to avoid more haircuts. Still, Dijsselbloem’s presentation of the measures appeared cold and his alleged Dutch bluntness provoked comments like the one by Juncker that you sometimes have to lie as chairman of the Eurogroup – as if financial markets preferred unreliability instead of predictability.

Also, the role of the chairman of the Eurogroup seems to be widely overestimated, if one has a close look at the EU power structure. A lot of criticism on Dijsselbloem is politically naïve in view of the strong resistance against the Cyprus bail-out not only in Germany but also in countries such as France where EU Affairs Minister Moscovici talked about “casino banking” on Cyprus. It seems widely regarded as reasonable to bail-in bondholders and deposit owners – particularly in the absence of an effective European resolution mechanism.

Hence, Dijsselbloem seems to have withstood the criticism well so far. Yet, there are issues for which he could be criticised, which in some cases can be blamed on his lack of experience. First of all, he made himself more important than he really is by ̶ during the hearing before the European Parliament ̶ taking the blame for the bailing-in of savings below €100 000 in the first deal with the Cypriot government. Firstly, the chair (President of the Eurogroup) is not a decision maker but mainly a spokesman: it was the decision of the Eurogroup to bail in those savings. Secondly, he referred to the bail-in of Dutch bondholders. A chair should be as neutral as possible and avoid telling the world how good his native country is in dealing with a crisis. Particularly Dutch politicians should take care not to be too outspoken. Dijsselbloem’s presentation of the Netherlands as a role model fuelled the criticism that he was pursuing a national agenda. Thirdly, he talked in terms of “core” and “periphery countries” as well as “the north” and “the south” whereas a chair should avoid divisions at any cost (as he later seemed to have realised).

Even though these issues are mainly issues of style and nothing serious, the international press once again saw a reason to complain about Dutch bluntness and about pushing through the Northern austerity agenda. Similarly, when Dijsselbloem, as Dutch Minister of Finance, attacked the Commission’s request for an additional € 11.2 billion for the budget for 2013, a question basically unrelated to the euro crisis, this led to head lines such as ”Dijsselbloem, president of the Eurogroup, joining forces with the UK” (EurActiv 3 April 2013). This shows that it seems to be inevitable that the chair of the Eurogroup is not regarded as neutral but as a national politician.

If Cyprus can cause an existential euro crisis overnight, it is very likely that more and more serious crises are to be expected. Against this backdrop, complaints about Dutch bluntness, accusations of Dijsselbloem acting as a German puppet or being part of the British camp, are particularly unhelpful both for the EU and for the Netherlands. What the Eurogroup urgently needs is a professional chair!

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

What a Tomato Can Tell us about the Euro

22. March 2013, von Adriaan Schout, Comments (0)

In order to form an opinion on the effects of the euro, we could start out from a simple question: what sort of impact had the introduction of the euro on a specific product, let us say a tomato, that a country (e.g. the Netherlands) cultivates and exports? The Netherlands has a strong horticultural sector. At first sight, it seems as if the Dutch exports in horticultural products have benefitted greatly from the euro. In 2010, almost 10% of the workforce worked in the production, knowledge development and trade of vegetables and fruits. 75% of the exports of tomatoes, cucumbers, paprika, etc. were within the EU. Exports within the EU have benefitted from European integration since 1992 with the removal of trade barriers, the definition of common food laws, the protection of patent rights and the introduction of the euro. Since the introduction of the euro in 2002 the exports of vegetables and of fruits have increased massively with 90% and more depending on products and regions. Exports to southern European Member States have proven to be particularly impressive with a growth of 241% between the introduction of the euro and 2010. Does this mean that the euro was a big success?

There are many reasons for this sharp increase in exports from the Netherlands and for the increasing imports by the southern Member States. One explanation for the favourable exports between 2002 and 2010 was the introduction of the euro. Tomatoes and related products are bulk products with low margins. Hence, the export success depends on enormous volumes combined with low profits margins. As a result, small changes in costs result in major changes in trade. The introduction of the euro contributed in two ways to the export success. The euro implied lower transaction costs, and lower costs with bulk products imply more exports. In addition, the economic conditions in the southern countries was inflated due to investments in housing, the inflow of cheap capital and high consumption. There were few incentives within the eurozone to lower wages and prices. As a result, Dutch horticultural exports to southern Member States flourished and investments in production went up, meaning that the success of the Dutch production and exports was partly a sign of failing market adjustments in the south.

Evidently, this upswing in Dutch exports has had its flip sides. Production in the south was pushed back before 2010. At the same time, investments in the Netherlands had gone up leading to the current overcapacities. These days, Dutch export of tomatoes within the EU is dropping. At first sight, this might appear to be a logical consequence of the general economic crisis given that consumption is falling in many eurozone countries. What is much less realised is that it is also the introduction of the euro that can partly be blamed for the present economic setback in horticulture. Currently we see wages in southern eurozone countries dropping, production and export of horticultural articles from the south are increasing, and, as a result, imports from the Netherlands drop and exports to the northern countries increase. Dutch export is not only dropping towards southern countries but also towards countries like the UK due to stronger competition from southern tomatoes.

Looking back, it would have been better had the market for horticultural products remained more in balance. The success of the exports was in part the result of failing markets within the eurozone. Would markets have adapted more smoothly, exports from the Netherlands would not have grown so fast and this would have prevented overinvestments and less adjustments once the crisis set in. Similarly, production in the south would have increased earlier had markets been more flexible.

This shows that the introduction of the euro – a macroeconomic development – resulted in microeconomic imbalances in the market for horticultural products. Looking back, the increase in Dutch exports following 2002 was too high and is now followed by a reversal of trade flows. The story of the tomato tells us that the increase in exports due to the euro was also a sign of insufficient adaptations in the south and has resulted in a hard landing that could have been prevented had the euro not functioned as a ‘sleeping pill’ to postpone market adaptations. At the same time, export surpluses were not matched by adaptations in exchange rates so that adaptions in the end have been more abrupt. What goes up must come down. Paradoxically, the euro has aggravated the ups and the downs. Like it or not, the well-functioning of markets is even more important with the euro.

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

Is there an Alternative for Europe in Germany?

15. March 2013, von Almut Möller, Comments (1)

In my last blog I made the point that despite Germany being a major player in the reform of the eurozone and despite federal elections taking place in the fall of 2013, Germans at the moment seem rather indifferent about the eurozone’s future direction.

I found this to be rather baffling, since the decisions taken by eurozone leaders these days are not mere technical or legal adjustments, but will determine the substance of policies in the currency union and have already done so.

But is it really true that Europe is absent in the minds of German citizens? Perhaps it is a question of weeks now.

The election campaigns haven’t got into full swing yet, as the political parties are still in the process of putting together and adopting their platforms. And it was only this week that a new party with a distinctly anti-euro profile has entered the stage (to which I will come back).

Over these past two weeks, both the leaders of the Green Party (BÜNDNIS 90/DIE GRÜNEN) and the Social Democrats (SPD) have presented their draft platforms to the public. The Greens will put the draft to their party congress in Berlin in late April. In June, every party member gets the chance to cast a vote on the top ten priorities for the Green campaign. As to the Social Democrats, their party congress will convene in mid-April in the southern German city of Augsburg to adopt the 2013 platform. Those seeking for “Europe controversy” in the country notorious for its “Europe consensus” are likely to eventually find some food for commentary at these gatherings.

Leafing through the 100-pages platform of the SPD and searching for “Europe”, there was a particular thing that struck me. EU matters have usually been framed as a grand thought and duty for Germany, more of a political ritual found in intros or conclusions, or in the obligatory chapter at the end in pamphlets of this kind (sometimes together with foreign policy). For voters that made the effort to read through those pamphlets, things must have quite naturally looked as something of a separate matter (“We will work for a better Germany for you, and then there is also the EU which we, good Germans as we are, want to build.”).

Today, European affairs have become much more a matter of policy substance – and with issues such as budget and banking supervision or the tax on financial transactions, quite naturally, intertwined with the domestic context. The new message, accelerated by the past years of crisis, is “We will work for a better Germany for you, and our playing field to achieve this is also Europe”. In other words, we can only preserve our freedom, prosperity and social justice in this world when taking much more responsibility for each other. My guess is that this is a line that still won’t go down naturally with traditional SPD voters.

Needless to say that for the Greens, advocating Europe in such a way is an easier argument to make. The party’s environmental agenda, one of its main pillars since entering the formal political arena in Germany thirty years ago, is by its very nature a field in which the borders of nation-states do not matter all that much.
It is too early to tell though whether the parties challenging Angela Merkel’s return to the chancellery manage to frame their agendas to really make a difference – and to portray European affairs no longer as a matter of statecraft at EU summits, but of political choices, of political drama and of majorities.

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

The French Squeeze

14. March 2013, von Adriaan Schout, Comments (0)

There are signs that the economies in the eurozone are picking up in various ways. Recent figures of the ECB on Target2 (the capital account of the eurozone countries within the ECB) show remarkable signs of improvement. The claims of the triple-A countries Germany, Finland and the Netherlands on the problem countries are going down. The Dutch and the German claims at the peak of Target2 lending in 2012 amounted to € 173 billion and € 750 billion, but these have dropped by almost 20% since. There are many explanations for this development. Draghi’s promise to do ”whatever it takes” to keep the eurozone intact, has created the trust needed to restart trade in sovereign debt of Spain, Ireland, Portugal and Italy. In addition, (wage) reforms and austerity measures have reduced the imports; investors are returning and exports of for example horticultural products are increasing.

These developments in the south imply enormous reductions in risks for the budgets of northern countries. If the situation in the problem countries had deteriorated, the Target2 claims could have end up as losses – and downgrades – for the triple-A countries. These claims are not just important in terms of abstract risks on the ECB books, but they also have practical implications for the national debt positions. The Dutch government used the profits from the Central Bank on the sovereign debts from Southern countries to lower its public debt figures, so that the deficit is at least cosmetically closer to the 3% monitored by Olli Rehn. However, including the Target2 risks of the ECB in the national budgets would show that national debts are potentially much higher. Also in this respect the drop in the ECB’s Target2 exposure is good news.

However, the difficulties in the eurozone and the Target2 risks are far from over. The Global Competitiveness report for 2012-2013 displays the many remaining economic hurdles in the eurozone including repeated warnings over inflexible labour markets in Spain. Moreover, the outcome of the recent elections in Italy obviously creates additional challenges.

The real worry however is France. Its Target2 deficit has not gone up due to the deterioration of its current account. Moreover, its public debt is rising above 95% – which means that its debt becomes unsustainable. The global competitiveness index of France has fallen last year from 18 to 22. It is doubtful whether the French social economic institutions – including its labour relations – are up to the economic challenges France is facing. Despite the efforts of Olli Rehn with the reinforced EU semester, France has shown few signs of improvement over the past year. Worryingly, with the economic reforms in its neighbouring countries including Spain and the Netherlands, its competitiveness and current account balance is being threatened from all sides.
We saw in August 2011 that financial markets woke up to the worries over Italy’s economic situation. Typically, this awakening did not happen with a whisper but with a bang. The crisis in the eurozone was then probably at its worst because of the size of the Italian economy. An immediate crisis over France may not be around the corner, but all ingredients for the next major euro problem are present. Symbolically as well as economically, a eurocrisis over France would be extremely damaging to the European integration project as a whole.

It is surprising that the French interest rates are currently still comparable to those of Germany. Either financial markets are irrational or they are counting on Draghi’s unconditional support for France. Both explanations would be very dangerous economically and politically. Irrational financial markets could prove to be extremely volatile and a repetition of August 2012 is possible. Alternatively, German – and Dutch – patience with Draghi and the ECB could reach its limits. FDP chairman Brüderle already warned France that reforms are needed. The EU cannot afford an existential crisis because of French economic negligence.

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

Why Economists Should not always Ask for Centralisation

25. February 2013, von Adriaan Schout, Comments (0)

Many say that the eurocrisis is not about the euro but about financial markets. Whatever the precise cause: it seems to be a purely economic crisis. Of course, the financial sector was a motor behind the crisis, but there have been other drivers too. National conditions – such as high private debts, corruption and inflexible labour markets – inflated the bubbles and accelerated the economic crisis once these bubbles burst. With this in mind, it is somewhat strange to see that the bulk of the economic discussions about solutions for the eurocrisis concern deeper integration at EU level.

Economists have pointed to the impossibilities of working with a half-baked EMU. The euro started as a Monetary Union while the Economic (now called: political) Union was lacking. What this political union should have included, according to the economic analyses, are a central bank with more responsibilities, EU bonds to reduce interest rates and solidarity mechanisms. A second focal point in the debates is the question whether austerity is wise. Economists are happy to call for EU growth initiatives and transfers.

Given these profound economic debates, it is no wonder to see far-reaching economic solutions in Barroso’s Blueprint for a genuine EMU: an additional EU budget, steps towards eurobonds, etc.

The consequence of these economic solutions is centralisation (federalisation) including treaty change. Hence, Barroso’s plans are also about transforming the Commission into a European government, European taxes, a larger EU budget and a stronger role for the European Parliament. Many economists de facto want a political union.

Yet, northern countries lack trust in southern governments and are therefore unwilling to accept EU bonds, to pay for a banking resolution mechanism or to accept other moves towards a transfer union. In the end, the EU seems to remain stuck with the Mundell-Fleming ‘impossible triangle’ that states that the combination of fixed exchange rates, free capital movement and independent monetary policy cannot be maintained.

This call for deeper integration seems perverse integration. The eurocrisis originated at national levels. Hence, the national level is the level where solutions have to be found and implemented first of all. Understanding the eurocrisis requires institutional, in addition to economic, analysis. Banking supervision was failing in all countries. National statistics proved unreliable. National political parties suffer from corruption and regional governments have been deeply involved in the housing bubble. The relevance of the national level is also with a view to the fact that the national publics lack enthusiasm for this federalisation process.

National institutions determine the state of the economy and many of these institutions have been ineffective. It is impossible to construct an EMU with (semi) failing states. Politicians need to do what they hate the most: accept independent European (in whatever form) scrutiny of their national administrations. This involves assessing the independence and quality of national statistical systems, national budgetary control authorities, deregulation authorities, tax collection systems, etc. In addition, scrutiny is needed of the quality of social economic councils in Member States, of the size and quality of  regional governments, of the management of political parties, of transparency policies in member states, of labour market and education systems, of anti-corruption policies, etc.

The measures proposed by Barroso to strengthen the EMU will become much less needed if Member States possess institutions with self-cleaning capacities. It is contrary to the subsidiarity principle in the Treaty to centralise decision making in the EU when many of the problems originate at national levels of government and when further measures can be taking at the national level. The food crisis in the 1990s was not solved through a ‘Food Union’ but by building food authorities incorporated in European networks supported by appropriate legislation and independent national controls. Similarly, competition policy in the EU is now based on independent national authorities. If Member States do not trust each other’s administrations, steps towards a closer union will be impossible. Similarly, if Member States have effective national institutions, there will be much less need for centralisation. By the same token: centralisation will fail – and lack public support – if national governments are weak. Evidently, reforming national institutions cannot be done without EU networks and EU legislation, but the bulk of the reforms should be national. This could also prevent that ‘Brussels’ is used as scapegoat, even though the Commission will always be put in the position to criticise Member States, if they lack self-correcting mechanisms. Weak Member States will, therefore, create an automatic dislike of the EU.

This focus on national institutions is also needed to break the stalemates in social policy. A growth agenda is partly blocked due to lack of trust in national institutions. Triple-A countries are afraid of reducing reform incentives elsewhere. Yet, without social support, the euro could fall apart due to the consequences of collective austerity. However, growth will not come from more money (there is no), but has to be based on sound national policies and sustainable national institutions.

National institutions should be targeted first of all in the discussion on deeper integration. Barroso’s agenda towards a genuine EMU seems logical to economist who ignore the importance of national institutions but it will never work or it will require a transfer union that is politically extremely dangerous.

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

Euro crisis: a View from Lisbon

20. February 2013, von Alexandre Abreu, Comments (0)

In my first contribution to this blog, I would like to start with outlining what I’ll set out to do in the coming months. The readers of this blog will be quite familiar with the ‘orthodox’ account of the current crisis in the eurozone: profligate public spending by governments in the European periphery, which need to be brought under discipline from the outside, coupled with anaemic growth/recession largely caused by excessively high wages and excessive labour market regulation, calling for ‘structural reform’. Moreover, readers will also be well acquainted with some of the systemic aspects which have long been emphasised by the more politically-progressive accounts: the inability on the part of peripheral economies to adjust to asymmetric shocks after having forfeited most of their economic policy instruments; their dramatic loss of competitiveness due to an overvalued Euro and an overvalued implicit internal exchange rate; the ECB’s late, indirect and highly conditional assumption of its role as lender of last resort; not to mention the deleterious effects of austerity upon growth, employment, social cohesion… and even the budget deficit and the sustainability of public debt themselves.

I will not be rephrasing these arguments in detail. Rather, in addition to commenting on new developments as they occur, what I’ll try to do is to render all of the above a bit more vivid to you by showing how these rival accounts apply to the Portuguese case; how general factors and forces at the European level articulate with class interests in Portugal; what the effects of the prescribed medicine have been in this country; and what the balance of forces and the state of the public debate are at any given moment.

As an appetiser of sorts, here are some of the issues that I’ll be expanding on in my next few blog posts:

  • Seen from the left, burgeoning public debt is largely a consequence of the crisis, not a cause (Portuguese public debt stood at 72% of GDP in 2008, compared to over 120% at present). However, there have been, and continue to be, serious issues concerning the quality of public spending (including public-private partnerships that commit the Portuguese Government to ensuring internal rates of return in excess of 10% to major conglomerates for decades to come).
  • Seen from the left, rising labour costs in Portugal have not been the cause of deteriorating competitiveness (indeed, unit capital costs have increased more than unit labour costs over the last two decades). Rather, the overvalued (implicit and explicit) exchange rate, alongside the inability to upgrade the pattern of productive specialization (itself explained by structural factors), are what is to blame.
  • Seen from the left, the medicine that has been prescribed in tandem by the ECB-EC-IMF “troika” and the right-wing Portuguese government places all the burden of an “adjustment” which will not work upon those who are most vulnerable and least responsible: workers and popular classes. This involves dismantling a Welfare State that is barely 40 years old, having been a product of the 1974 democratic revolution – a settling of scores long sought by the most conservative sectors of Portuguese society.
  • Seen from the left, the way in which the crisis has been addressed so far by both the Portuguese and European authorities is not at all about bringing public debt under control or boosting competitiveness. Rather, it is about seizing a unique opportunity to re-engineer society in neoliberal fashion, by dismantling the Welfare State and sharply compressing direct and indirect wages.

These are critical, dangerous, but also very interesting times. I hope you’ll find my left-leaning views from Lisbon to be interesting and informative, too.

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

Blog Authors

Adriaan SchoutAdriaan Schout

Dr Adriaan Schout is Deputy Director Research/Europe at Clingendael, Netherlands Institute of International relations. (read more...)

Alexandre AbreuAlexandre Abreu

Dr Alexandre Abreu is a 33-year-old Portuguese economist with a PhD from the University of London. Currently he is a lecturer in Development Economics at the Institute of Economics and Business Administration, Technical University of Lisbon, and a Researcher at the Centre for African and Development Studies of the same University.

Almut MöllerAlmut Möller

Almut Möller is a political analyst in European integration and European foreign policy. She is currently the head of the Alfred von Oppenheim Centre for European Policy Studies at the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) in Berlin. (read more...)

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