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What is EU Membership all About?

19. December 2013, von Almut Möller, Comments (0)

This is my last entry in the Eurozone 2013 blog. I want to conclude with some general remarks tackling what sounds like a rather innocent question and is the subject of a paper I am working on: What is EU membership all about? The question was put to me for a talk at a summer school in Britain earlier this year. Needless to say, the British are particularly concerned with what I call the changing notion of EU membership. Is it essentially about the single market, Eurozone membership, or about a community of rules and values? All of them really, one might respond, but things are not that simple anymore.

Ever since the governments of the Eurozone started to repair the dysfunctional economic and monetary union the notion of membership has been blurred. This development is nothing new – we have seen that the essence of EU (formerly EC) membership shifted along with successive treaty reforms, most markedly with the Treaty of Maastricht that significantly widened the scope of joint policies. With the need to further integrate EMU in the course of the crisis we are currently seeing yet another shift of membership – one that might turn out divisive.

What kind of union are we talking about? This question challenges not only the political identity of euro and non-euro members of the EU-28 such as the UK and Poland. It also poses questions for countries eligible to or on their way to membership such as Serbia and the other non-EU Balkan states or Turkey for that matter. While the pre-crisis European Union was by no means the monolithic bloc as which it was often portrayed the notion of membership got even less clear cut in the course of the crisis.

Why does this matter? Has the union not been dealing with different layers (a colleague once branded it the “European Onion”) for quite some time, the euro and Schengen being the most prominent examples? From an outside point of view, the demarcation between Europe as a continent, the European Union of 28 members and the eurozone of 17 – 18 with Latvia joining in 2014 – is not that clear anyway and not so important. For EU Member States, however, the degree to which they participate in the union’s policies clearly matters. It determines the rules that countries have to adopt, their rights and obligations, their access to policies, institutions, decision-making and resources. It matters to the daily reality of citizens in the EU’s Member States – think, for example, of borderless travel granted only to Schengen members. And, one aspect that gained particular relevance in the course of the crisis: the degree of participation in the EU’s policies, in particular EMU, influences the overall clout of Member states in the Union. The power question is back.

Arguably the direction of the Union is defined by the members of the eurozone nowadays. True, most non-Euro members signed up to the new legal arrangements that were adopted since the beginning of the crisis, and countries within the eurozone tried to keep the ‘outs’ close to their bosom. A fragmented Union is risky for all Member States, and realising this has so far been the glue for cohesiveness. But will it hold as the eurozone continues to move ahead next year?

The notion of membership has also been challenged when it comes to the Union’s values. What role do Member States still attribute to the values of their founding treaties? How could Member States invite Greece to join the Eurozone with such obvious deficiencies in its state functions and its market economy? A question that not only the union’s newest member Croatia might ask after having been through a detailed and demanding fitness regime in preparation for accession. Then, how on earth was it possible that the most important countries of the eurozone, Germany and France, both on several occasions violated the Stability and Growth Pact ten years ago without being sanctioned by the European Commission – arguably the early kiss of death for the euro in its current shape? What makes the Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orbán so confident in pushing his luck with fellow EU countries, turning his back on fundamental rights and freedoms at home?

While the EU has developed a sophisticated set of instruments to encourage good behaviour and to punish when its rules and values are disrespected in its enlargement policy, it struggles to pull similar carrots and sticks with fellow EU members. Overall, the respect of rules and values has been watered down – consequently, member states take a certain freedom in interpreting them these days. This is a most damaging side effect of the crisis that member states will have to deal with in years to come.

The upcoming elections to the European parliament will demonstrate how vulnerable the Union has become with regard to its values. Parties and movements that claim they want a different Union but that in reality don’t want the Union to work will manage to capitalize from this worrying development.

There are two lessons from 2013 that policymakers should bear in mind in 2014: EU membership must not be divisive, and it must bring values to the fore again.

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

Are we Living in a Post-EU Society?

20. November 2013, von Adriaan Schout, Comments (0)

There seems to be a paradox: whereas the euro crisis has enforced deeper integration, economic and political attention is shifting away from the EU. Europhiles blame the Eurosceptics but EU-watchers should be careful to follow simplistic reasoning.

Dutch Foreign Affairs Minister Frans Timmermans has the reputation to be an EU-believer and was, among others, a convinced member of the Convention that drafted the Constitutional Treaty. When he became minister of foreign (including EU) affairs, the general impression in the Netherlands, and the rest of the EU, was that his appointment was a good sign of the Netherlands becoming pro-EU again. However, now one year in office, Timmermans has shown himself rather critical of the EU. He talked about a ‘Brussels bubble’ that has lost touch with reality, criticised EU salaries and insisted on closer control of the EU Commission by the European Council (i.e. intergovernmentalisation of the Commission). Of course, it is possible to contribute this to pragmatic kowtowing to the political signs of our times or to the more reserved EU attitude of the Dutch liberal Prime Minister Rutte and his coalition government of which Timmermans is a member.

Yet, there is more. Minister Timmermans is also travelling extensively abroad. In fact, he is much more in other parts of the world than in Brussels or in EU Member States. One could could argue that the Dutch international influence via the EU would be more pronounced and, hence, that the use of all his international activism outside the EU is debatable.

In the meantime, across the channel, Cameron has expressed the possibility of an in-out referendum. A part of British industry has been issuing threats of leaving the country, and many in the EU are once again appalled by the Brits who continue to be unsurpassed EU-sceptics. However, rather than condemning – as so often happens – the Brexit discussion ignited by Cameron, we could also try to take the British debate seriously. Similarly, we might need to consider that Timmermans’ external perspective is well-founded. In any case, it has to be admitted that the British are good at thinking outside the box, so maybe there is more substance behind the Brexit debate than simple Euroscepticism.

Studies also show that big as well as small and medium-sized industry in the UK question the relevance of current EU policies and of the importance of the EU. Whereas about half of the UK’s exports go to the EU, the other half is going to other parts of the world and, more importantly, it is there where the growth in export – not just the UK’s ─ is taking place. Discussions about competitiveness are now primarily linked to comparisons with countries such as India, China, Brazil and the USA.

Hence, rather than sticking to European navel-gazing, it seems justified to look at the rest of the world for market opportunities and for new threats. In principle, questioning social policy objectives – maybe precisely because they are more symbolic than real – and other developments in for example the growing tasks of the ECB and in the EU’s economic governance, seems a valid starting point in the current debates on the future of the EU. It is crucial to consider what such trends imply for the EU’s competitiveness. This is important from an economic perspective but one also has to consider that the EU’s international security and influence are intimately related to its economic strength. External benchmarking of the EU’s competitiveness should not suffer from internal euro crisis debates.

The EU may have to come to terms with the fact that we work and live in a post-EU society, which also helps to put the traditional European claims into perspective. There is a keen awareness in the Netherlands that 70% of our trade goes to countries within the EU, especially to countries within 1000 kilometres of our borders. This has actually little to do with the EU. Trade relations with neighbouring countries are bound to be important, irrespective of the European integration project. Although important, extensive trade with countries close by are more or less traditionally given. Trade with other parts of the world is clearly increasing and posing new and painful challenges. To focus trade relations more on the rest of the world seems a natural and necessary development.

We in the EU may have to accept the post-EU society as a reality. Voters, consumers and industry have interests beyond the internal market and internal eurozone worries. This recognition has, in principle, little to do with anti-EU sentiments. It would be a mistake to taboo those who’ cast their nets out further’. On the contrary, accepting this might actually help us to get a better focus on what is important within the EU, e.g. standing together in external relations, and what is potentially dangerous such as, for example, creating a French-type EU. The European Union is important, but there is a lot more in the world that counts.

Europe For Citizens

“This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.”

Blog Authors

Adriaan SchoutAdriaan Schout

Dr Adriaan Schout is Deputy Director Research/Europe at Clingendael, Netherlands Institute of International relations. (read more...)

Alexandre AbreuAlexandre Abreu

Dr Alexandre Abreu is a 33-year-old Portuguese economist with a PhD from the University of London. Currently he is a lecturer in Development Economics at the Institute of Economics and Business Administration, Technical University of Lisbon, and a Researcher at the Centre for African and Development Studies of the same University.

Almut MöllerAlmut Möller

Almut Möller is a political analyst in European integration and European foreign policy. She is currently the head of the Alfred von Oppenheim Centre for European Policy Studies at the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) in Berlin. (read more...)

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